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    Category: Cakewalk
    Cakewalk Guitar Studio

    Cakewalk Guitar Studio

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    Taking the classic analogue sound of the legendary silver box into the future, PHOSCYON offers an unmatched sound together with advanced features such as a state of the art Distortion unit; fully user configurable BPM syncd Arpeggiator and Randomizer; a unique Play Live mode; vintage arrangement and pattern builder, full MIDI CC support and, to top it off, the most authentic 18db/oct low pass filter ever created!

    Diehard fans of the original Bass Line will be blown away with PHOSCYON’s uncanny emulation of the classic, but will also marvel at the ease with which new sounds can be crafted; sounds which were not possible on the original. PHOSCYON gives you access authentic vintage sounds at a fraction of the cost of the real thing. With the familiar Bass Line interface coupled with the added sound generation tools, we at D16 Group feel that PHOSCYON is quite simply in a class of its own.

    PHOSCYONs designers are also musicians who believe that in order for electronic music to stay relevant, it needs to evolve – just like any other genre. Our approach is to give forward thinking musicians and producers the tools they need to craft the sounds they want. Whether it’s Techno, Acid, Triphop, IDM, D&B, Ambient, or any other kind of genre-bending music, PHOSCYON will take your sound further. Please visit our ONLINE SHOP to start making new music now with PHOSCYON!

    Capabilities

    Phoscyon is a vintage analogue modeled Bassline synthesizer with a unique low pass filter with an 18db/oct dumping and constant resonance amplitude throughout the entire frequency domain. The filter sounds phenomenal! Hear that squelch and you’ll swear its analogue! We’ve also equipped it with a fully customizable integrated arpeggiator (essential in electronic music) as well as an exhaustively analogue modeled distortion effect, crucial for those screaming acid bass lines!

    Hear the sounds of for yourself in the Audio samples section and be prepared to be amazed!

    Phoscyon is PC and Mac VSTi version, but AU is in development. Release date is not known at the moment.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Guitar Studio for $39.95

    Cakewalk Home Studio 2004

    Cakewalk Home Studio 2004

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    DRS 2006 is a digital audio system that handles your MP3-Files. It was designed for radio stations, dance clubs, events and parties or home usage. Features include a Auto Gain Control, Multiband Maximizer & Brickwall Limiter Plugin. Requires Windows Media Player and DirectX.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Home Studio 2004 for $39.95

    Cakewalk Music Creator Pro 24

    Cakewalk Music Creator Pro 24

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    Finalis is a cross-platform (RTAS, VST, AU) brick wall limiter that has three distinct limiting algorithms, a user-configurable ceiling, and built-in gain control. Highlights include input and output peak meters with integrated RMS and peak hold readings, along with the company’s new I/O Crest Factor meter, which gives a quantifiable indication of how a signal’s dynamics are being affected by the limiter settings. Sweet.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Music Creator Pro 24 for $29.95

    Cakewalk Project5 (Soft Synth Workstation)

    Cakewalk Project5 (Soft Synth Workstation)

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    The long awaited revision of Emagics flagship product, Logic Audio, has finally hit the streets with Version 5.0, and it looks like the research and development team has been busy. The update boasts enhancements that include overall performance optimization; numerous new plug-ins and virtual instruments; and, of course, the necessary revision to the automation architecture. Emagic has also teamed up with the folks at Mackie to create a control surface and ancillary models that even the most ardent mouse tweakers should consider as necessary tools in their production arsenals.

    Total recall seems to be the feature du jour in digital audio workstations (DAWs) these days, and Emagic has taken it a step further by introducing a tactile option with the Logic Control surface. Virtually every parameter within Logic can be recalled, manipulated and transmitted via the control surface. In addition to the typical fader, pan and mute capabilities, the ability to tweak plug-in settings, virtual instruments and even custom SysEx faders is a powerful option that transforms Logics capabilities into a real-time, tactile experience.

    AUTOMATION
    After installing the software, the first thing I wanted to check out was the much hyped and heavily anticipated automation update. Up through Version 4.8, editing automation within Logic could be a bit cumbersome. The parameters and resolution were built around MIDI, and automating some parameters was spotty and inconsistent; plug-in automation was especially unreliable.

    With Version 5.0, Emagic has created an all-new, track-based, sample-accurate automation engine (see Fig. 1). Just about every parameter can be automated, including effect plug-ins and audio instruments. The automation engine is sample-accurate with 32-bit resolution and works independent of the sequencers record status, so tweaking offline is possible and easy to do. Plug-in and instrument delay compensation is an optional feature, so time-based latency issues — a thorn in the side for many DAW users — have been addressed.

    The fader automation and Hyper Draw functions have been integrated into a system that works similar to a traditional moving-fader mixing console. The various Automation modes can be activated by a selector button on the faders. Read, Write, Latch and Touch modes are selectable via a mouse click. Automated parameters are displayed in the Arrange window with the full name and values, and color-coded automation data is displayed directly in the Arrange window as envelopes with break points. Parameter adjustments on a fader object, including plug-in parameters, automatically show up highlighted with the name of the parameter as data in the color-coded submenu beneath the corresponding track in the Arrange window.

    The ability to draw automation curves has been implemented, and curves are freely adjustable between convex, concave, S-form or linear shapes. Break points can be freely drawn, edited and scaled. Automation data can be viewed or hidden on the corresponding track, and various controller data can be nested within a track. The ease of use in dealing with curves is a far cry from the old Hyper Draw. Other automation features that should be considered for future development are a Trim/Update mode, grouping and snapshot capabilities — functions that are found in even the most basic automation packages on consoles.

    Ive been using moving-fader automation on consoles for years, and one feature I like to tap into is the ability to adjust the “ramp” recovery time, or the time it takes a fader to return to its original setting before being changed, while updating faders in Logics Touch mode. For example, if youre doing a mix and want to touch up levels on a track, you can move a fader to the desired level, release the fader, and it will glide back to its original state at the rate that is set in the Ramp Time parameter setting. That allows for smooth level transitions, slow fades and other useful fader automation tools. I was happy to find that Logic allows you to do this with any parameter — including plug-in settings. I was quickly automating parameter sweeps that would have taken much longer if I had to draw them in.

    LOGICAL CONTROL — FINALLY
    Joining forces with Mackie, Emagic worked diligently to develop a control surface that would mesh tightly with the application. The result is the Logic Control surface along with the XT expansion unit, and, as expected, the units are indeed Mackie-like in look and feel (see Fig. 2). Logic Control works with Logic 5.1 and above, and the XT Expander adds another eight physical faders. The units link to Logic via MIDI, and each unit requires its own MIDI In and Out ports.

    The interface comprises eight channel strips with 100mm Penny & Giles motorized, touch-sensitive faders, along with a master fader. Each channel strip is made up of a rotary pan pot with an LED and buttons for Record-Ready, Solo, Mute and Track Select. Communication between the application and the hardware is bidirectional; therefore, on-screen changes or those made within Logic Control are updated on the fly. Logic Control displays the loaded songs track names, instrument names and virtual-instrument names. Users can switch layers via the Left and Right Bank buttons, which enable the eight channel faders to access an unlimited number of audio and MIDI channels. Parameters are shown on a two-line display that runs across the top of the control surface.

    The faders main function is to control channel levels, whereas the rotary controllers can be switched between track, pan, EQ, sends, plug-ins and software instruments using the six Assignment buttons. Each of the Assignment buttons allows the user to switch between Multi-Channel View and Channel Strip View. Multi-Channel View shows the selected control setting for each channel. When more than eight controls are needed at a time, the user will need to scroll through to the next set of eight faders unless an XT expander is being used.

    Setting up the Logic Control within the application is fast and intuitive. After linking up with the program, the control surface quickly displays track names and virtual-instrument names. The program also checks to see if Logic Controls firmware is current with the software version that is running. Firmware updates are embedded in the application, and as more functionality is implemented within the development of the program and the controller, updates to the firmware may be necessary. So, in this sense, the control surface is as much a work in progress as the program is. In my case, a firmware revision was indeed necessary to install; however, the process was easy, and the results were rock solid.

    In addition to the controls found in the application, the transport section has a shuttle wheel with a latching scrub wheel. The control surface also includes Automation Control, Save and Undo buttons; keyboard modifiers; and a set of function keys. Multifunction Zoom and Page Through buttons are located close to the scrub wheel.

    Once I got up and running, the responsiveness between the application and Logic Control was fast and smooth. Accessing the automation parameters via the controller is as simple as pushing a button. Mixing with a mouse, in any application, pretty much sucks, so it felt good to allow my fingers to tweak faders and plug-in parameters that Ive been moving on-screen for so many years. Ive always felt that mixing is as much about performance as it is about engineering.

    PLUG-INS AND INSTRUMENTS
    Now that it is firmly the age of the DAW, just about everybody is developing plug-ins and software-based virtual instruments. Emagic jumped into the fray quite a while ago and has been handily exploiting the increased out-of-the-box CPU power. With the Logic 5 series, the plug-in choices are numerous. More than 50 plug-ins are included right out of the box: various delays, reverbs, distortions, dynamics, modulation effects, BitCrusher, Auto Filter, Enveloper, Spectral Gate and others. Of those, Phase/Clip Distortion, Denoiser, DeEsser, Tremolo, Stereo Spread, Exciter, SubBass, Limiter, Adaptive Limiter and a Multiband Compressor are all new. The plug-ins range from basic utilitarian to the downright tweaky. The sound quality and tweak factor, especially of the newer ones, range from good to excellent. In the overcrowded sea of plug-ins that has flooded the market in the past few years, Emagic has continued to develop and release plug-ins that stand above much of the competition.

    Pro-level users who use Logic as a front end for Digidesign Pro Tools hardware can route the native Emagic plug-ins and instruments through the Digidesign Direct Connect bus via Emagics ESB TDM plug-in. Emagic has also announced that it is porting a number of its plug-ins as TDM versions in the third quarter of 2002. Support for HTDM has also been announced for release in Q3.

    In addition to the audio plug-ins, Emagic has released two new virtual instruments: the EVOC20 and the ES2. The EVOC20 consists of two virtual instruments and two plug-ins based on a 20-band filter bank. The instrument includes a MIDI polysynth section enabling it to act like a conventional vocoder. The filter bank can be spread and shifted, and both units allow the user to select just a part of the input spectrum for analysis and exploitation. One part of the package is a vocoder plug-in that utilizes a monophonic oscillator to track the pitch of the input signal and is fed to one of the vocoder inputs to produce variations on the vocoder sound. Another function is based around a user-adjustable filter bank with the ability to morph between two filter settings, as well as to adjust the resonance of each filter band.

    Using the instrument out of the box, I was amazed at the variations and quality of sounds that I was able to get. Presets designed to highlight timbral and rhythmic aspects of the EVOC20 are installed, providing starting points for custom settings.

    The other virtual instrument, the ES2 polysynth, follows a three-oscillator, two-filter topography and has the ability to combine elements of analog, FM and wavetable synthesis to produce a range of sounds. The oscillators include all the standard analog waveforms, as well as a large selection of “digiwaves.” Analog-style phase sync has been modeled, and the ES2 includes dynamic vector synthesis and various tempo-related functions for rhythmic effects; the two filters can be used in series or parallel. In addition to onboard effects, the ES2 has innovative features that include constant beat-oscillator detune and a variable-percentage randomize function for modifying existing patches within controlled limits. It is relatively intuitive to use and can produce complex, evolving textural sounds, as well as convincing analog emulations.

    OTHER ENHANCEMENTS
    Although it is clear that this is a major revision in which energies were directed at the automation and control surface, quite a few other enhancements to the program are present. Tweaks were made to the look and feel of the Arrange window, and the transport functions have been enhanced. Multiple Undo is now a (welcome) option. The notation functions have also been given a large number of improvements: the ability to color notes by pitch, velocity or musical part; multiple-page view; a new step-time input; and an editing facility (which works in the Score, Matrix and Event List windows).

    Various improvements have been made to the EXS24 sampler, including the ability to use virtual memory when the onboard RAM isnt enough. REX2 file support has also been added. Logic 5.0 also has support for importing and exporting OMF audio files. All products in the Logic series now offer support for 24-bit, 96kHz recording. Mac OS X support is planned for a revision later in 2002.

    FINAL THOUGHTS
    Logic Audio has always been a major player in the sequencer market, and as CPU speeds have increased and drive space has become cheaper, Emagic has done well to exploit the technology at hand in innovative and powerful ways. The automation and other goodies that are now part of the application — not to mention the plug-ins — make this update well worth the money. Add the Logic Control surface into the equation, and powerful things are definitely on the horizon for what is now a major step in the programs evolution.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Project5 (Soft Synth Workstation) for $99.95

    Cakewalk Pyro AudioCreator 1.5

    Cakewalk Pyro AudioCreator 1.5

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    Since the review of Emagics SoundDiver 1.5 in the July 1995 issue, the program has undergone several updates. Many new features consist of cosmetic overhauls, changes in nomenclature, bug fixes, and new editors for devices that hit the streets after version 1.5. In addition, several substantive changes deserve closer scrutiny, including the programs beautifully enhanced graphics, support for key commands, and consistency of features between Mac and Windows platforms. SoundDiver ships with Mac and Windows versions on the same CD-ROM. Since the release of version 3.0, the two platforms share identical features (except for the differences between Mac and Windows menu conventions and MIDI interface support).

    I installed SoundDiver on my Power Mac 8500 running OS 8 without a hitch. The program no longer supports 68000 Macs, but any PowerPC will do. The copy protection scheme consists of a temporary authorization from the CD-ROM. After the hard drive is authorized, the program requests the original CD every few weeks. A week before the authorization expires, SoundDiver presents a warning so you wont be caught by surprise. That beats dongles and is better than losing installations from hard-disk crashes, but its not especially convenient.

    WHERES MY GEAR?
    When first launched, SoundDiver scans the MIDI ports to sort out the interfaces and patch bays connecting the MIDI gear and then quickly opens the Install window (see Fig. 1). That window provides a list of editors for an array of synthesizers, samplers, drum machines, effects processors, and other devices. At the left of the list are three buttons for installing editors: the Scan All button polls your MIDI system for each device on the list (and takes a while); the Scan button checks only for selected devices. I recommend using the latter. If all of your devices arent recognized, the Add button lets you select and set up devices manually.

    I first tried the Scan All option. After a lengthy assessment of my connections, the Setup window opened to reveal only some of my systems devices (see Fig. 2). That isnt necessarily the programs fault. For example, my Casio VZ-10s primitive implementation necessitates manual installation and dumps from the front panel. My Kawai K5m defaults to SysEx-disabled whenever it is powered on.

    SoundDiver has added support for Open Music System (OMS), allowing users to switch freely between the programs built-in MIDI system and OMS. I created a new installation using OMS as a MIDI driver; to ensure an accurate setup, I quit the program and trashed my SoundDiver preferences in the System folder. When I restarted the program, SoundDiver was initialized and ready to set up. After a new scan of my system, the Setup window showed duplicates of many devices. I continued the installation and deleted the duplicates afterward. When MIDI devices are scanned and accounted for, they appear in SoundDivers Setup window, and a dialog box pops up asking if you want to request the memories from your devices. At that point, you can retrieve the data stored in your devices for editing or safekeeping in a library.

    HELLO, INFORMATION
    MIDI devices appear in the Setup window as realistic three-dimensional icons, along with a virtual patch bay line connected to a virtual computer. Clicking on an icon opens the Device window (formerly called the Memory Manager). The Device window displays your synthesizers memory architecture (see Fig. 3). I double-clicked on my Korg Wavestation A/Ds icon and was greeted with a window containing a layout of the synths Byzantine memory architecture, including Patches, Wave Sequences, Performances, Multimode setups, Global parameters, and even user scales. That can be a double-edged sword.

    With all of that information presented at once, finding your way around (especially in devices as complex as the Wavestation) can be difficult. Fortunately, SoundDiver provides several ways to focus on what you need. Buttons at the top of the Device window can hide or reopen any level of the devices memory structure, such as programs, combinations, and Global settings. Furthermore, you can display or hide each bank retrieved from the device, which lets you isolate a single memory area for editing. You can also zoom the Device window in or out for a broad or narrow overview of the devices contents.

    The Library window lets you store anything, from a devices patches to your MIDI systems memory contents. Because libraries can hold just about everything that you need to store, its important to keep track of related data, and SoundDiver nicely handles that task. For example, clicking on a Korg M1 Program in the Librarian window reveals a list of Combinations that use the Program. Similarly, clicking on any Combination provides a list of Programs that comprise the higher-level sound. Deleting a Program opens a dialog box warning you that youre about to remove a component of a higher-level memory structure, thus preventing your carefully sculpted brass-section Combination from sounding like a Martian banjo orchestra or vice versa.

    EDITORIAL ASSISTANCE
    Double-clicking on a devices memory constituent (such as patch or performance) opens the Edit window. Top-level Combinations that usually provide patch layers, Velocity switching, splits, and so forth have handy edit button links to the lower-level patch components. In that way, you can easily shuttle between the performance and its components, making edits as needed. If you think that seems like too much for one monitor to handle, youre right. However, you can resize windows to focus on what you need and save window settings as Screensets. You can then toggle between screens with key commands.

    SoundDiver displays your patchs architecture in gorgeous, color-coded detail. You can change the color of backgrounds, parameters, parameter labels, value fields, and even the handles that shape the envelopes.

    In some cases, Emagics programmers extended features beyond a devices native capabilities. For example, in addition to the typical programming parameters on the Kawai K5000 additive synthesizer series, SoundDivers Patch editor provides a three-dimensional time-and-amplitude waveform display, a pull-down menu of preset analog synthesizer waveforms, and an assortment of preset Formant Filter settings. Moreover, you can load a digital-audio file for analysis and resynthesis to provide a raw oscillator waveform from which to work. The results provided a good number of interesting timbral springboards for programming. Although that feature was not introduced in version 1.5, the instrument (and consequently, its editor) arrived on the scene after the review in EM. Furthermore, the Import function didnt work reliably until version 3.0.

    ON THE SURFACE
    SoundDiver now supports a variety of MIDI control surfaces, including the Radikal Technologies SAC-2K (see p. 146 for a review of the SAC-2K). I dont own a dedicated control surface, but I installed a dummy unit in my Setup window to check out Emagics new drag-and-drop programming feature. As usual, double-clicking on the SAC-2K icon opens the Edit window; however, in place of an abstraction of the devices memory contents, you get an enlarged view of the control surface. To assign controls to a synthesizer parameter, simply open the Control Assignment window, click on one of the virtual SAC-2Ks faders or buttons, and drag a virtual patch cord to a synth editor parameter in another window. The intuitive user interface for programming control surfaces let me program the dummy SAC-2K with a knob that could select high or low harmonics in my K5000W synth (see Fig. 4). I then assigned a fader to change the gain level of the selected group of harmonics. The entire process took less than ten seconds.

    SoundDiver lets you set up a MIDI keyboard as a control surface to edit other synths. You can map practically any incoming MIDI message to control an editing parameter, so even if your master keyboard offers only the standard set of Modulation and Pitch Bend wheels, you can quickly press them into service as editing tools. I opened one of my Oberheim Matrix-6R patches, highlighted the FM Amount parameter, and hit Command + L. I could then adjust my Matrix-6R from my Korg M1 and play while I edited. You can test edits for playability as you make your changes — a very musical approach to programming.

    Another clever editing feature is the Overview window. It provides a generalized view of a devices parameters and signal flow, which lets you make coarse adjustments to the patch (see Fig. 5). A single-click just outside a gadget that adjusts parameters opens a full-feature editor with the selected parameter visible in the center of the screen. You can toggle between detail and overview from a field at the top of the Edit window. Thats great stuff because it lets you locate and focus on the elements you need to work on, despite a potentially bewildering array of parameters.

    Unfortunately, the Overviews are not consistently implemented in all of the editors. The K5000W editor module offers more parameters than could possibly fit on one screen, yet it has no Overview. Thankfully, the editor for the Wavestation A/D does. The work-around is to create multiple Edit windows for a device with each window showing a different parameter area. You can then resize the windows and switch between them. Edits made in one window are linked to the other windows, but that approach seems like a cluttered and rather clumsy way of focusing on what you need.

    You can also grab the bottom-left corner of an Edit window (just before the scroll arrow) and drag directly to any group of parameters. Thats a handy navigational tool, but I would most welcome a context-sensitive pull-down menu for jumping to a specific group of parameters (such as the filter section). When navigating a complex device, dragging until you find your area of interest is not the most elegant solution.

    ADAPT OR DIE
    Adaptations are user-created editors, and the Adaptation Editor does not let you create Overviews, so Adaptations dont have Overview windows. That brings me to my next big gripe: of SoundDivers 346 editors, 65 are Modules and 295 are Adaptations. It may seem trivial in the face of so many supported devices to carp about the ratio of Emagic-authored to user-created editors. However, Adaptations differ from Modules in many ways, and sometimes their feature sets are minimal. For instance, the K5R Adaptation offers no editors whatsoever; it offers only librarian capabilities. Modules are generally full-featured editors. Its great that SoundDiver includes facilities for creating editors; as an end-user, however, I would much rather spend my time with music and sound design than with tables of SysEx values.

    The manual is quite good and thoroughly tackles the enormous number of features. Additionally, the CD-ROM contains PDF files with documentation listing supported devices and editable parameters. You also get a programming guide for creating Adaptations and an application for compiling Help files. The software provides extensive context-sensitive help, though the program often quit unexpectedly in the midst of selecting topics.

    DIVER DOWN
    An editor-librarian program can be far more than an efficient tool for retrieving, managing, and creating patches for MIDI gear. A consistent graphical user interface (GUI) can offer windows into the inner workings of synthesizers by presenting a better visual understanding of the devices architecture and signal flow.

    I have strong but conflicting feelings about Emagics SoundDiver. Its powerful, feature-laden graphical editors are often hampered by the sheer amount of information they contain. Fully developed editors run alongside sometimes less-than-utilitarian Adaptations.

    The Overview window helps alleviate the information overload, but its not implemented consistently. However, the software supports a slew of MIDI devices — far more than Ill likely ever own — and some of SoundDivers features are absolutely inspired. Whats more, the editors often provide additional tools that cater to a devices unique features.

    SoundDivers focus on an almost totally graphical user interface provides incredibly intuitive programming. Yet the sheer task of navigating the windows can be tedious and counterintuitive — the interface giveth; the interface taketh away.

    Regardless, SoundDiver is a powerful and versatile tool, and I look forward to the programs next release. You may not want to wait that long to check it out.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Pyro AudioCreator 1.5 for $19.95

    Cakewalk PYRO Plus 2005

    Cakewalk PYRO Plus 2005

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    One of the most flexible VST sequencers available on the Windows platform. You can even run it inside another sequencer as a VST plugin rack. energyXT was voted top 3 in the KvR member survey (in the Overall commercial host of the year category). You simply cant go wrong with energyXT.

    - Supports VST Instruments & effects
    - Avilable both as standalone and VST version (load it into another DAW)
    - Effects and Instruments can be routed freely
    - ASIO playback and multi-track recording
    - Includes free upgrade to the upcoming version 2.0

    Sequencer:
    Easy to use MIDI & audio sequencer with track freeze, track groove and time-saving ghost clips. The easy to use Piano roll features a great step mode for quickly entering drum beats and basslines. Theres even a random function for making variation of drums, bass and melodies.

    Sampler:
    Built-in polyphonic sampler with multi-mode filters and powerfull modulation routing. Create great sounding patches with envelopes, LFOs, the built-in delay and unison effect. Loads 16/24/32-bit samples in moro/stereo.

    Skins:
    Create your own custom skins, or download user skins from the internet. Almost anything in energyXT can be replaced by a color or bitmap.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk PYRO Plus 2005 for $14.95

    Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 1

    Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 1

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    PRECOG is special, sampler based synthesizer thathelps you to make your music dreams come true! Why should you by extremely expensive software or real synthesizers if you can achieve special sounding with this software too? Even if you work with Trance or smoother melodies, trancegate, high quality reverb or cutoff filter – in PRECOG you find anything you need . If you work on a single monitor, the small size and easy-handling provides great advantage. There are no unnecessary buttons, only the vital functions are shown.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 1 for $14.95

    Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 2

    Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 2

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    FL Studio is the most complete virtual studio currently available. It will play any sample file (wav), generator (softsynth), VSTi & DXi) or midi instrument you feed it.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Rapture Expansion Pack 2 for $14.95

    Cakewalk Rapture VSTi DXi RTAS 1.1

    Cakewalk Rapture VSTi DXi RTAS 1.1

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    FX Teleport is a unique and revolutionary DAW networking solution. From
    now on its not only possible, but also very easy, to use as many
    computers as you want for your DAW. Just launch your favorite VST host
    on one machine and VST instruments and FX on the others, and enjoy
    working on your ‘audio processing farm’. You can even dedicate a whole
    computer to your favorite VST synth.

    Why you may need FX Teleport?

    If the CPU resources on your main machine are insufficient, you may
    want to use another machine for the heaviest FX/Instruments. Using FX
    Teleport you can easily turn your home or project studio into a really
    powerful audio processing farm. Even if your CPU horsepower is
    sufficient for your needs, adding an extra machine will eliminate the
    peaks of CPU, HD and RAM usage, increasing the overall reliability of
    the system. Convenience reasons: a dedicated machine means dedicated
    keyboard, mouse and monitor just for control over your FX – which in
    the end may replace a dedicated hardware control unit (like for
    instance HUI). Just remember how many times you wished there had been
    another mouse. Overall stability: in case your FX plug-in crashes the
    machine, the host machine with your song will remain stable and you
    wont lose your work. You work on a project with someone else: another
    person may want to help you tweak your FX parameters while you are
    mixing, or make some finishing touches on your sequencer. You want to
    get the most out of your software synth: you can almost turn it into a
    hardware synth if you dedicate a whole machine to it. Just assign the
    whole machines CPU, RAM and HD, set the heaviest programs and FX, and
    this will not affect the whole system in any way – and you will no
    longer need to do preliminary bounces and mixdowns in order to free up
    some CPU power for more plug-ins on your host machine. How does it
    work?

    Its all very easy. On the host machine, where the sequencer is
    running, theres a VST wrapper. You will see a new VST folder named
    FX Teleport with all the familiar plug-ins, but with (LAN)
    extensions. You can use those FX in the usual way you work with VST
    plug-ins. When such an effect is used, the VST wrapper launches and
    searches for FX Teleport server applications on the network, and on
    finding those starts the chosen effect on the remote machine. Next the
    VST wrapper serves as a bridge between the host and the remote machine.
    It flows the stream to the effect and processed signal back to the host
    machine.

    If you are working ‘on location’, or youre just too lazy to turn on
    additional machine(s), you have nothing to worry about – the wrapper
    will search the network, and having found nothing it will just start
    the FX on the host machine in the way it used to work before you
    installed FX Teleport. Then if you feel youre getting out of
    horsepower on the host machine, just start the other one(s) and
    teleport your FX with a single mouse click.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Rapture VSTi DXi RTAS 1.1 for $39.95

    Cakewalk Rgcaudio z3Ta Plus Dxi Vsti 1.5

    Cakewalk Rgcaudio z3Ta Plus Dxi Vsti 1.5

    Product Overview:

    Features:

    Giga Teleport is a tool allowing to integrate one or more dedicated Giga Studio
    machines into DAW. The only connection between the DAW machine and the Giga
    Studio machine required for Giga Teleport to work is a local network, therefore
    no additional audio or MIDI interfaces on Giga Studio machines are necessary.
    MIDI streams from the DAW machine to the Giga Studio machines, while audio from
    Giga Studio streams back to the DAW machine, all via LAN.

    Current version of Giga Teleport may be used with any VST 2.0 compatible host
    (Cubase, Nuendo, SONAR, Logic, etc.). Support of AU and VST compatible host
    applications under Mac OS X is in development.

    If you want to use dedicated machines not only for Giga Studio, but also for
    running other VST effects or instruments, youll have to use FX Teleport in
    combination with Giga VST Adapter. Giga VST Adapter itself can be used for
    running Giga Studio on the same machine with the host application.

    Buy & Download oem Cakewalk Rgcaudio z3Ta Plus Dxi Vsti 1.5 for $24.95